Plausinaitis Wins Big on WSOP Circuit Main Event

Jaguars’ Hiring of Chris Doyle Called ‘Unacceptable’ by Fritz Pollard Alliance


An organization that promotes diversity in the N.F.L. on Friday criticized the Jacksonville Jaguars’ recent hiring of Chris Doyle, who left the University of Iowa’s football staff last year after a number of current and former Hawkeyes players said he had fostered a culture of bullying and racism.A statement from the Fritz Pollard Alliance, which is named for the first Black head coach in the N.F.L., said the Jaguars’ decision to make Doyle their director of sports performance was “simply unacceptable.”“Doyle’s departure from the University of Iowa reflected a tenure riddled with poor judgment and mistreatment of Black players,” Rod Graves, the executive director of the Fritz Pollard Alliance, said in the statement. “His conduct should be as disqualifying for the N.F.L. as it was for University of Iowa.”Doyle, who was Iowa’s strength and conditioning coach, reached a separation agreement with the university in June, ending two decades of work there.The Jaguars announced on Thursday that Doyle had joined the staff of Urban Meyer, who was named Jacksonville’s head coach last month. Meyer, who won two college national championships as the head coach at Florida and one at Ohio State, has not coached since 2018 and has never worked in the N.F.L. before.The hiring of Doyle, who is white, comes at a time of intense scrutiny of the N.F.L.’s hiring practices and questions about whether minority candidates for coaching jobs have equal opportunities to be hired.“I’ve known Chris for close to 20 years,” Meyer said on Thursday when questioned about hiring someone who had been accused of mistreating Black athletes. Doyle was the strength coach at the University of Utah in the late 1990s, a few years before Meyer was hired as the head coach there.“Urban Meyer’s statement, ‘I’ve known Chris for close to 20 years,’ reflects the good ol’ boy network that is precisely the reason there is such a disparity in employment opportunities for Black coaches,” Graves said in the statement.Neither the N.F.L. nor the Jaguars responded to a request for comment on the Fritz Pollard Alliance’s statement.During a news conference last week, N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell said that he was not satisfied with the rate at which coaches of color have been hired in the N.F.L., which has 32 teams.“It wasn’t what we expected,” he said of the diversity in the round of hirings after the 2020 season, “and it’s not what we expect going forward.”Of the seven head coaches hired since the end of the regular season, just two were nonwhite. Last year one of five head coaching jobs went to a minority candidate, and the year before just one in eight.Over the last three years 80 percent of head coaching jobs have gone to white candidates, though players of color made up 69.4 percent of the N.F.L. this season, according to the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.After the Jaguars hired Meyer and General Manager Trent Baalke, who are both white, last month, Graves praised the organization for interviewing several minority candidates and for seeking input from the Fritz Pollard Alliance.“I cannot argue that the process didn’t meet the standard of fair, open and competitive,” Graves told The Florida Times-Union.The hiring of Doyle, however, raised issues beyond the N.F.L.’s commitment to diverse hiring.Before Doyle left Iowa, Emmanuel Rugamba, a former Hawkeyes defensive back, gave multiple examples of the coach demeaning players with negative racial stereotypes. Rugamba said in a tweet that one day after a Black player walked away from Doyle, the coach said, “Why you walking wit all that swagger I’ll put you back on the streets.”James Daniels, a Chicago Bears offensive lineman and a former Hawkeye, tweeted over the summer: “There are too many racial disparities in the Iowa football program. Black players have been treated unfairly for far too long.”Doyle also presided over an off-season workout in 2011 that resulted in the hospitalization of 13 players.

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ระบบรางวัลสามัญสำนึก

Baseball Works to Confront Its Treatment of Women


Fury built inside Melissa Ludtke when she read about a second recent revelation of sexual harassment of female reporters in Major League Baseball. She had fought against sexist treatment when she was in the same role earlier in her career, so the topic is personal.In 1977, Ludtke and Time Inc., the parent company of her employer at the time, Sports Illustrated, sued M.L.B., among others, when she was denied access to the clubhouses at Yankee Stadium. A year later, a district court judge ruled that denying Ludtke the same access male journalists enjoyed was a violation of the 14th Amendment.“I’m dismayed that after 42 years since the decision came down basically saying that women reporters should be treated equally to men, the attitudes don’t seem to have evolved in the way you might have expected they would,” Ludtke said in a recent phone interview.Over the past month, news reports have exposed accusations of sexual harassment against Mets General Manager Jared Porter, who was swiftly fired, and the Los Angeles Angels pitching coach Mickey Callaway, who remains suspended pending an investigation. These have been painful examples of the way women in and around baseball are treated. In response, M.L.B. tweaked its harassment and discrimination policy, established an anonymous third-party hotline to report issues and mandated training for top club executives.“What’s happened in baseball most recently is just a wake-up call,” said Renée Tirado, who joined M.L.B. in 2016 as its chief diversity and inclusion officer before leaving in 2019. “And it was inevitable. We’re in an age of social media. We’re in a different type of age that demands a different type of accountability.”Tirado added that she thought baseball currently had “the fundamental and foundational components to do better.”“It’s just now a matter of actualizing them and prioritizing them,” she said. “And that’s where not only sports but all industries fail — we react instead of being proactive. I will rest on the fact that I think baseball will now operate in the sense of being proactive. And they had to learn. Everyone had to learn. This is their #MeToo moment.”Once excluded from the sport, women have made notable inroads in improving their representation in M.L.B. More women are joining front offices and coaching staffs, such as Bianca Smith of the Boston Red Sox or Alyssa Nakken of the San Francisco Giants. And after being passed over for several openings, Kim Ng finally broke through when the Miami Marlins hired her in November as their general manager, making her the first woman to hold that title in major league history.Progress, though, doesn’t mean the deep-rooted problems have evaporated in an industry still dominated by men and sometimes referred to as a boys club, and where a commonly repeated refrain is, “what happens in the clubhouse stays in the clubhouse.”“I don’t know that we’ve begun to even skim the surface on how to address what’s both cultural and at times generational issues,” said Lonnie Murray, who has been a baseball agent for 15 years.She pointed to the criticism that Sandy Alderson, the president of the Mets and a longtime baseball executive, received for admitting recently that no women were consulted in vetting Porter before he was hired in December. She said Alderson is well respected in baseball, but she wondered how much of a blind spot the sport had developed.“Because in what has been deemed traditional baseball, there hasn’t been really a need to talk to women about how a guy was doing his job because women didn’t exist in the positions to have those reviews,” she added.M.L.B. updated its harassment and discrimination policy this week, in an effort spearheaded by its new chief people and culture officer, Michele Meyer-Shipp. Commissioner Rob Manfred announced the changes in a memorandum sent to all team owners, presidents and general managers. He attached the new code of conduct and a fact sheet titled “M.L.B. Speak Up,” which outlined the league’s rules and potential discipline, and how to report a complaint. Both, he wrote, should be hung as posters throughout clubhouses and press rooms.“Depending on the severity of the situation, remedial action may take the form of a warning, a suspension, termination of employment, or any other measures available to a Club or the Commissioner,” read a portion of the hotline poster, which also promised that reports would be taken seriously, handled confidentiality and that there would be no retaliation for any complaints made in “good faith.”Manfred also instructed each club to send its most senior baseball operations and business executives — five from each side — to anti-harassment and discrimination training slated for next month. He asked clubs to ensure similar training was done for all other staff members.“Harassment and discrimination have no place within Major League Baseball,” the league said in a statement. “We are grateful for the courage of the women who have shared their stories, and we believe that an open dialogue is an important part in progress.”The introspection has extended to teams who, suddenly, were trying to update their hiring practices or improve their workplaces. The Cubs’ president of baseball operations, Jed Hoyer, who was the team’s general manager when Porter was the professional scouting director there, told reporters that teams should vet prospective employees as extensively as they do first-round draft picks and make sure their environments are safe for women. Top executives of the Cleveland Indians, another of Callaway’s former employers, and the Angels announced similar efforts.Murray said much of the conversation of late has involved reporters because “women within M.L.B., no matter what type of policy is put into place, it doesn’t protect them from repercussions.” She cited an incident about five years ago, when she got drinks with several scouts after a tournament. Meeting up at the hotel bar after a long day to talk about work is commonplace.But when she called it a night, she said, one of the scouts followed her into the elevator and then grabbed her in the hallway. She said she screamed, he apologized repeatedly and left. She said she doesn’t talk much about this or identify the person because of the stigma that would follow her.“Questions will arise: ‘Well, how late was it, and why was she sitting down there with all those guys drinking?’” she said, adding later: “So where else am I supposed to get information? Who am I supposed to communicate with? How do I go around the good old boys club? You can have video from the hotel that shows exactly what happened and people will still question it. And even if they don’t question, guys will say, ‘Well, don’t invite Lonnie because there was some stuff that went down.’”Over all, Murray said her experience in baseball has been “fantastic.” She said that she wouldn’t be where she is in her career without some men in baseball, but “I don’t seek to protect anyone by any stretch of the imagination.”Tirado said harassment in baseball was attributable to “people who have bad behavior unchecked.”“I think that’s the collective failure of not just baseball but of all sports who do not check the behavior early,” she said.While Ludtke said she saw and heard inappropriate things while covering baseball, she said she was lucky not to experience the same level of sexual harassment female reporters have faced now. Ludtke, who retired and is writing a book tentatively titled “Locker Room Talk: A Woman’s Struggle to Get Inside,” said modern technology, such as Twitter and text messaging, has made it easier to harass women in and around baseball.Tirado said that the recent revelations of harassment, as “gross” and demoralizing as they were, may help move the needle for progress because women have been let down by the law, regulations and policies for decades.“We cannot continue to live under the scriptures of a sport that started where there were no women anywhere,” she added later. “Behaviors that keep getting passed down and on and on. I would love to see baseball have men leading this conversation.”Tirado said more women at all levels of organizations, particularly in leadership, will help baseball evolve, though the burden shouldn’t be on just them. She said she remained optimistic that baseball can improve in terms of equality.“The beauty of this, too, as painful as this is right now for the sport, this is a moment of empowerment for women as well,” Tirado said. “The mic is turned on.”

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WSOP POY OPS!

A Surge of Women in Ski Patrols, Once Nearly All Men


They have endured the indignity of being addressed in their uniforms as “he” or “sir’’ at first blush and at times sexism, too, when injured skiers balk at a woman taking charge of getting them down the mountain on a rescue toboggan.But as the number of women in ski patrols has increased, so has acceptance that the service, a network of volunteer and professional organizations nationwide dominated by men for decades, is finally catching up to the times.Kari Brandt, 33, a ski patroller in Nevada, recalled a recent rescue of a 250-pound injured man, who did a double-take upon her arrival, but didn’t utter a complaint as she directed his transport down a mountain on a toboggan.“That was one where I told the other patrollers, ‘I’m taking this toboggan.’ They nodded and said, ‘Yes, you are,’” said Brandt, the ski patrol director at Diamond Peak Ski Resort in Incline Village, Nev., and the founder of a group aimed at growing the number of women in the industry. “None of the guests opposed. They didn’t fight back because they could tell I was in charge.”Taylor Parsons, 29, joined the Diamond Peak patrol this season, partly because she had heard accolades about Brandt.“It empowers other women to join when the highest person up is a woman,” Parsons said. “I feel confident around Kari. She rips on her skis and knows exactly what she’s doing in the medical field. It’s inspiring. It definitely makes me want to be better and keep going with it.”Parsons, a snowboarder, was recently working on the mountain when she was flagged down by a father skiing with his young daughter.“He said, ‘I just want to tell you that my daughter wants to switch to snowboarding now, after seeing you,’ ’’ Parsons said the father told her. “‘She thinks it’s so cool a girl can do snowboarding and also do ski patrol.’ That makes you want to keep going just to inspire other little girls.”Ski patrollers, regarded as among the best skiers and snowboarders around, are not only emergency medical workers who treat and transport sometimes severely injured people. Their duties can also include hauling and placing heavy materials like fences, signs and equipment for lift towers and deploying explosives to lessen avalanche dangers. Larger resorts employ dozens of paid patrol members, but thousands serve as volunteers.Either way, men have dominated the ranks but there has been an uptick in the number of women, who now account for 23 percent of the 31,027 patrollers nationwide, up from 19 percent in 2007, according to membership surveys and registration with the National Ski Patrol, the organization that provides most training to people in the service.“There are high expectations for ski patrol, whether that’s physical or mental toughness, emotional intelligence or problem solving on-the-spot,” said Addy McCord, the ski patrol director at Beaver Creek Resort in Colorado. “When there are women on a team like this, it lends an important voice and perspective to the job. I can say that having women on patrol keeps everyone connected. Men muscle their way through the job and women do it with finesse.”McCord, one of the longest-standing professional patrollers in the industry, has been with the Beaver Creek Patrol for 40 years. When she started in 1981, there were only two other women. Now, women make up nearly one-third of her team of more than 60 patrollers.“There is no doubt that I see this trend continuing,” McCord said. “It’s important for women to see themselves represented on patrol and in leadership roles on the mountain. Having not only women, but diversity in perspectives, has elevated this entire team.”In 1985, when Julie Rust began patrolling at the nearby Vail Ski Resort, there was a similar dearth of women on the squad. When she became patrol director in 2001, she and McCord struck an immediate bond and forged ahead together as trailblazers.“The fact that there were two of us in the room, we had each other to lean on,” Rust said, recalling her early days at regional director meetings.“She and I were facing things with a different perspective than others in the industry,’’ she added. “We quietly redirected the meetings, ensuring that everyone’s time was well spent. We were on the periphery, but along the way, it ended up we were in the middle of the group.”The female ski patrollers in leadership positions said they encourage stronger communication, creative approaches to physical tasks and improved teamwork. They said they seek alternatives to scolding errant skiers like taking on a calm, conversational tone rather than yelling.Although they are as thorough as men in directing training, they said they seek to be more patient and accommodating of rookies.“A range of learning styles is how everyone is going to become the most capable patroller possible,” said Shannon Maguire, assistant patrol director at Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort. “Retaining females helps retain additional females.”Linda Barthel, a 30-year volunteer patroller at Michigan’s Mt. Brighton and former women’s program adviser to the National Ski Patrol, agreed.“Taking a high-level mogul clinic from an instructor that was also 5-foot-2 was an absolute inspiration; I was ready to follow her anywhere on the mountain,” Barthel said. “As a patroller, we are expected to transport injured guests of any size in a toboggan. During one of my toboggan evaluations, I watched a fellow female candidate — the only other woman in the group — negotiate the loaded sled through a different route than the guys were using, working smarter, not harder. I saw and said, ‘I can do that,’ and I did.”Kolina Coe, 30, remembers her first day on patrol 12 years ago at the Northstar Resort in California at age 18. She said she was nervous about meeting the physical demands of the job and “being surrounded by strong men who were a foot taller.”She rode up the lift with another equally panicked female rookie. By the time they reached the top, they had shaken off their reservations and began diving into the work of setting up fences and tower pads.Now, Coe is the assistant patrol director at Northstar and pro liaison for the National Ski Patrol’s Women’s Program. Even with her long braid, she is often referred to as “sir” by injured skiers and encounters distrust from some patients she has to transport down the mountain. Still, she says gender barriers in the industry are unquestionably collapsing.“As our culture continues to push the needle on social norms, women empower each other and men advocate for their female counterparts,” Coe said. “Whether it’s on ski patrol or in the White House, we’ll continue to see more glass ceilings shattered as this perspective shifts. There’s been a wake-up call that women are just as strong and capable as men.”

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Elijah Muradi WPT Lucky Hearts Poker เปิดที่ $ 605K

โยชิโระโมริหัวหน้าการแข่งขันกีฬาโอลิมปิกที่โตเกียวเกี่ยวกับความคิดเห็นทางเพศใน Furor


โตเกียว – ประธานคณะกรรมการโอลิมปิกโตเกียวซึ่งกำลังเผชิญกับค่าใช้จ่ายที่เพิ่มขึ้นและเสียงโวยวายของสาธารณชนในการแข่งขันกีฬาฤดูร้อนนี้ได้รับการร้องเรียนใหม่เมื่อวันพุธหลังจากที่เขาแนะนำให้ผู้หญิงพูดมากขึ้นในการประชุม เขาตอบโต้ทางโซเชียลมีเดียหลังจากแสดงความเห็นเชิงเสื่อมเสียเกี่ยวกับผู้หญิงในระหว่างการประชุมออนไลน์ของคณะกรรมการโอลิมปิกญี่ปุ่น “ การประชุมคณะกรรมการกับผู้หญิงจำนวนมากใช้เวลานานมาก” โมริบอกกับ Laughter ตามรายงานของ Asahi Shimbun หนึ่งในหนังสือพิมพ์รายวันที่ใหญ่ที่สุดของประเทศ ผู้หญิงมีความรู้สึกที่แข็งแกร่งในการแข่งขัน ถ้ามีคนยกมือคนอื่นอาจคิดว่าฉันต้องพูดอะไรบางอย่าง นั่นเป็นเหตุผลที่ทุกคนพูดถึง “นาย. “ คุณต้องปรับเวลาพูดบ้าง” โมริกล่าวเพื่อตอบคำถามของอดีตนายกรัฐมนตรีโมริเกี่ยวกับแผนการของคณะกรรมการโอลิมปิกที่จะเพิ่มจำนวนสมาชิกคณะกรรมการหญิงให้มากกว่า 40 เปอร์เซ็นต์ “ ไม่งั้นเราจะไม่มีวันจบ” รายงานดังกล่าวเกิดขึ้นเมื่อผู้จัดงานโอลิมปิกได้ออกคำแนะนำเพื่อสร้างความมั่นใจให้กับประชาชนและผู้มาเยือนว่าพวกเขาจะมั่นใจในความปลอดภัยของนักกีฬาและคนอื่น ๆ ในระหว่างการออกอากาศซ้ำในฤดูร้อนนี้ , ผู้ใช้เริ่มเรียกร้องให้ชาวเมารีสละอำนาจ คนอื่น ๆ ชี้ว่าอายุและทัศนคติที่ล้าสมัยของโมริเป็นปัญหาที่แท้จริง โมริซึ่งเป็นสมาชิกของคณะกรรมการประสานงานของโตเกียวมาเป็นเวลานานกล่าวว่าการแข่งขันควรจะจัดให้มีการแพร่ระบาดระหว่างประเทศ เขาสังเกตว่าผู้หญิงสามารถพูดในแบบที่เหมาะสมกับมาตรฐานของเขา “นั่นเป็นเหตุผลว่าทำไมคำพูดของพวกเขาจึงซับซ้อนกระชับและสำคัญมาก” กว่าห้าเดือนจะผ่านไปจนถึงวันที่ 23 กรกฎาคมโตเกียวอยู่ในภาวะฉุกเฉินและการฉีดวัคซีนยังไม่เริ่มขึ้น โมริและคณะกรรมการจะเผชิญกับความท้าทายมากมายในฤดูร้อนนี้เพื่อโน้มน้าวให้สาธารณชนเห็นว่าพวกเขาจะต่อต้านการแข่งขันอย่างรุนแรง ในการสำรวจเมื่อเดือนที่แล้ว 77 เปอร์เซ็นต์ของประเทศสนับสนุนการยกเลิกหรือเปลี่ยนตารางเกม Masa Takiya โฆษกคณะกรรมการประสานงานของโตเกียวกล่าวว่าเธอไม่มีความคิดเห็นเกี่ยวกับความคิดเห็นของ Mori เกี่ยวกับผู้หญิง “นี่ไม่ใช่อะไรนอกจากการเลือกปฏิบัติต่อผู้หญิง” ผู้ใช้ทวิตเตอร์เขียนโดยระบุว่าการลาออกของ Mori ไม่ใช่เรื่องน่าตกใจสำหรับคนอื่น “ เขาควรได้รับการปล่อยตัวทันที ปัญหาคือไม่มีใครหยุดยั้ง ข่าวใหญ่คือที่สถานที่อย่างเป็นทางการของการประชุม Jock ต่อหน้าผู้สื่อข่าวและไม่มีใครหยุดการเลือกปฏิบัติได้

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